To automatically sync the AAAP Calendar of Events to your personal calendar, please follow the instructions on our Calendar Download page. For lists of other events, check out the AAAP Star Party Schedule, the AAAP Meetings Schedule, the International Astronomy Events, or the Our Pittsburgh Constellation Events pages.

2019 General Meetings: Jan 11, Feb 8, Mar 8, Apr 12, May 10

2019 Mingo Star Parties: Apr 27; May 24 & 25; Jun 21 & 22; Jul 12 & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 20 & 21; Oct 25 & 26; Nov 9

2019 Wagman Star Parties: Jan 20 (Total Lunar Eclipse); Apr 13 & 27; May 17 & 18; Jun 7 & 8; Jul 12, & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 6, 7, & 21; Oct 5 & 19; Nov 2

Please  Note: Alternate views of events (such as calendar view) are available by clicking the drop-down next to the word ‘Agenda’.

May
10
Fri
2019
AAAP Meeting
May 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting & Annual Officer Elections
Guest speaker and topic: Steve Quick presents, “Light Mapping Pittsburgh”

May
11
Sat
2019
International Astronomy Day
May 11 all-day
May
17
Fri
2019
Wagman Star Party
May 17 @ 8:30 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

May
18
Sat
2019
Full Moon & Blue Moon
May 18 all-day

May 18 – Full Moon & Blue Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 21:11 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance. This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon. Since this is the third of four full moons in this season it is known as a blue moon. This rare calendar event only happens once every few years giving rise to the term “once in a blue moon.” There are normally only three full moons in each season of the year. But since full moons occur every 29.53 days occasionally a season will contain 4 full moons. The extra full moon of the season is known as a blue moon. Blue moons occur on average once every 2.7 years.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Wagman Star Party
May 18 @ 8:30 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

May
24
Fri
2019
Mingo Star Party
May 24 @ 8:45 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

May
25
Sat
2019
Mingo Star Party
May 25 @ 8:45 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Jun
3
Mon
2019
New Moon
Jun 3 all-day

June 3 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 10:02 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jun
7
Fri
2019
Wagman Star Party
Jun 7 @ 8:45 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Jun
8
Sat
2019
Wagman Star Party
Jun 8 @ 8:45 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Jun
10
Mon
2019
Jupiter at Opposition
Jun 10 all-day

June 10 – Jupiter at Opposition. The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons. A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter’s cloud bands. A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter’s four largest moons appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jun
17
Mon
2019
Full Moon
Jun 17 all-day

June 17 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 08:31 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit. It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season. This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jun
21
Fri
2019
June Solstice
Jun 21 all-day

June 21 – June Solstice. The June solstice occurs at 15:54 UTC. The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude. This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Mingo Star Party
Jun 21 @ 9:00 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Jun
22
Sat
2019
Mingo Star Party
Jun 22 @ 9:00 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Jun
23
Sun
2019
Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation
Jun 23 all-day

June 23 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 25.2 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jun
28
Fri
2019
Baldwin Borough Public Library Star Party
Jun 28 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Exact Times and Details Still TBD

3AP Contact: Tim Kelly (t.m.kelly349@gmail.com)

Jul
2
Tue
2019
New Moon
Jul 2 all-day

July 2 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 19:16 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Total Solar Eclipse
Jul 2 all-day

July 2 – Total Solar Eclipse. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun revealing the Sun’s beautiful outer atmosphere known as the corona. The path of totality will only be visible in parts of the southern pacific Ocean; central Chile; and central Argentina. A partial eclipse will be visible in most parts of the southern Pacific Ocean and western South America.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jul
9
Tue
2019
Saturn at Opposition
Jul 9 all-day

July 9 – Saturn at Opposition. The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn’s rings and a few of its brightest moons.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html