To automatically sync the AAAP Calendar of Events to your personal calendar, please follow the instructions on our Calendar Download page. For lists of other events, check out the AAAP Star Party Schedule, the AAAP Meetings Schedule, the International Astronomy Events, or the Our Pittsburgh Constellation Events pages.

2019 General Meetings: Jan 11, Feb 8, Mar 8, Apr 12, May 10

2019 Mingo Star Parties: Apr 27; May 24 & 25; Jun 21 & 22; Jul 12 & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 20 & 21; Oct 25 & 26; Nov 9

2019 Wagman Star Parties: Jan 20 (Total Lunar Eclipse); Apr 13 & 27; May 17 & 18; Jun 7 & 8; Jul 12, & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 6, 7, & 21; Oct 5 & 19; Nov 2

Please  Note: Alternate views of events (such as calendar view) are available by clicking the drop-down next to the word ‘Agenda’.

Dec
21
Fri
2018
Ursids Meteor Shower
Dec 21 – Dec 22 all-day

December 21-22 – Ursids Meteor Shower. The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. This year the glare from the full moon will hide all but the brightest meteors. If you are extremely patient you might still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2018.html

Dec
22
Sat
2018
Full Moon
Dec 22 all-day

December 22 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 17:49 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark. This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2018.html

Dec
31
Mon
2018
First Night 2019 (12/31/2018)
Dec 31 @ 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm

First Night 2019 (12/31/2018)

AAAP Members sharing Sidewalk Astronomy at various locations throughout the Pittsburgh Area. Please contact vicepresident@3sp.org for more information.
KD12/18/2017

Jan
3
Thu
2019
Quadrantids Meteor Shower
Jan 3 all-day

January 3-4 – Quadrantids Meteor Shower. The Quadrantids is an above average shower with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak. It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1 which was discovered in 2003. The shower runs annually from January 1-5. It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th. The moon will be a thin crescent and should not interfere with what could be a good show this year. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jan
6
Sun
2019
New Moon
Jan 6 all-day

January 6 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 01:28 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Partial Solar Eclipse
Jan 6 all-day

January 6 – Partial Solar Eclipse. A partial solar eclipse occurs when the Moon covers only a part of the Sun sometimes resembling a bite taken out of a cookie. A partial solar eclipse can only be safely observed with a special solar filter or by looking at the Sun’s reflection. The partial eclipse will be visible in parts of eastern Asia and the northern Pacific Ocean. It will be best seen from northeastern Russia with 62% coverage.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Venus at Greatest Western Elongation
Jan 6 all-day

January 6 – Venus at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 47 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the bright planet in the eastern sky before sunrise.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jan
11
Fri
2019
AAAP Meeting
Jan 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting

Guest Speaker and Topic: Ryan Muzzio presents “Young Stellar Objects: The Opening Chapter in the Life of a Star”

AAAP meetings are always free and open to the public. This meeting will take place at the Allegheny Observatory. Parking is also free.

Additional Information:
The AAAP starts the New Year with a sure-to-be fascinating lecture on the early life of stars. We tend to think of stars as very old, but all stars start out as infants and toddlers, so to speak. Our guest speaker for the club’s January 11, 2018 meeting is himself a young star in the field of astronomy: Ryan Muzzio, a first year graduate student in the Department of Physics at CMU. Unlike recent years, we hold our first meeting of the year at Allegheny Observatory rather than the Carnegie Science Center, but at the standard start time of 7:30 pm.

Here is the synopsis of Mr. Muzzio’s lecture: “Stars have many complex phases of life. They form in some of the coldest places in the universe, output immense amounts of energy for billions of years, and die in magnificent ways. Many of the mechanisms that drive their early development still puzzle astronomers, making it a hot area of study. Fortunately, 400 light years away exists the Taurus and Rho-Ophiuchus molecular clouds, active star forming regions that are home to countless young stellar objects. These stars host a wide range of properties. Some have what seem to be unpredictable variations in luminosity, some have discs that interact with each other, and some have jets of ionized gas. Astronomers, using near infrared detectors, peer into the lives of these active stars and hope to shed light on how stars develop.”

The Usual Meeting Reminders: Of course, January can be an unfriendly month to travelers. If a major snow or ice storm is in progress on the 11th, we must cancel the meeting and schedule Mr. Muzzio’s talk for another time. Members can also check the AAAP’s Facebook page and 3ap.org web site for meeting status info. Parking is tight at AO, even when there is no snow on the ground, so please consider car-pooling so that we can squeeze everyone in.

Jan
20
Sun
2019
Wagman Total Lunar Eclipse Party
Jan 20 @ 10:00 pm – Jan 21 @ 2:00 am

Totality lasts from 11:41 to 12:44 AM.

Mid-eclipse is at 12:12 AM.

Guests will also have the opportunity to observe other celestial wonders during this event.

For additional info, visit us on Facebook (https://bit.ly/2CXIyai) or our website (3ap.org)

Jan
21
Mon
2019
Full Moon & Supermoon
Jan 21 all-day

January 21 – Full Moon & Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 05:16 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps. This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule. This is also the first of three supermoons for 2019. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Total Lunar Eclipse
Jan 21 all-day

January 21 – Total Lunar Eclipse. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth’s dark shadow (or umbra). During this type of eclipse the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color. The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America; South America; the eastern Pacific Ocean; western Atlantic Ocean; extreme western Europe; and extreme western Africa.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Jan
22
Tue
2019
Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter
Jan 22 all-day

January 22 – Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible on January 22. The two bright planets will be visible within 2.4 degrees of each other in the early morning sky. Look for this impressive sight in the east just before sunrise.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Feb
4
Mon
2019
New Moon
Feb 4 all-day

February 4 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 21:03 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Feb
8
Fri
2019
AAAP Meeting
Feb 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting
Guest speaker and topic: Annual Planetarium Show, Buhl Planetarium Theater, Carnegie Science Center

Feb
19
Tue
2019
Full Moon & Supermoon
Feb 19 all-day

February 19 – Full Moon & Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 15:53 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Snow Moon because the heaviest snows usually fell during this time of the year. Since hunting is difficult this moon has also been known by some tribes as the Full Hunger Moon since the harsh weather made hunting difficult. This is also the second of three supermoons for 2019. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Feb
27
Wed
2019
Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation
Feb 27 all-day

February 27 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 18.1 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Mar
6
Wed
2019
New Moon
Mar 6 all-day

March 6 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 16:04 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Mar
8
Fri
2019
AAAP Meeting
Mar 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting
Guest speaker and topic: TBD

Mar
20
Wed
2019
March Equinox
Mar 20 all-day

March 20 – March Equinox. The March equinox occurs at 21:58 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Mar
21
Thu
2019
Full Moon & Supermoon
Mar 21 all-day

March 21 – Full Moon & Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 01:43 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear. This moon has also been known as the Full Crow Moon; the Full Crust Moon; the Full Sap Moon; and the Lenten Moon. This is also the last of three supermoons for 2019. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html