To automatically sync the AAAP Calendar of Events to your personal calendar, please follow the instructions on our Calendar Download page. For lists of other events, check out the AAAP Star Party Schedule and the International Astronomy Events pages.

2019 General Meetings: Jan 11, Feb 8, Mar 8, Apr 12, May 10, Sep 13, Oct 11, Nov 8

2019 Mingo Star Parties: Apr 27; May 24 & 25; Jun 21 & 22; Jul 12 & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 20 & 21; Oct 25 & 26; Nov 9

2019 Wagman Star Parties: Jan 20 (Total Lunar Eclipse); Apr 13 & 27; May 17 & 18; Jun 7 & 8; Jul 12, & 13; Aug 9 & 10; Sep 6, 7 & 21; Oct 5 & 19; Nov 2

2020 General Meetings: Jan 10, Feb 14, Mar 13, Apr 10, May 8, Sep 11, Oct 9, Nov 13

2020 Mingo Star Parties: Apr 24 & 25; May 15 & 16; Jun 19 & 20; Jul 17 & 18; Aug 7 & 8; Sep 11 & 12; Oct 23 & 24; Nov 14

2020 Wagman Star Parties: Apr 3 & 4; May 1, 2, 29 & 30; Jun 26 & 27; Jul 24 & 25; Aug 21 & 22; Sep 5 & 26; Oct 10 & 24; Nov 7

Please  Note: Alternate views of events (such as calendar view) are available by clicking the drop-down next to the word ‘Agenda’.

Oct
18
Fri
2019
Hillman State Park Star Party
Oct 18 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

6:45pm – Presentation "Star Life"
7:15pm – Sky Viewing
Notes: There will be no moon that night, but 4 planets will be visible as well as many deep sky objects. The event takes place at the model airplane field. This is on top of a hill with
clear viewing in all directions.

Information for 3AP Volunteers: Those with scopes can drive onto the runway to setup.

Directions to Hillman SP's Radio Control Airport/Airfield:

From the North (Beaver)

Take PA-18 south
Turn Left at Light in Florence onto Steubenville Pike Continue 1.5 miles on Steubenville Pike Turn Left on Haul Road Continue 1.7 miles on Haul Road (Gravel and Asphalt Road) Turn Right on Kramer Road (Gravel Road) Continue 0.7 miles on Kramer Road and turn left into entrance of Hillman State Park's Model Airfield Follow gravel road to airfield at top of hill.

**Please note that once you enter Hillman State Park, follow signage for Radio Control Model Airport to find Hillman State Park's Model Airfield.

From the South (Burgettstown and Washington)

Take PA-18 north
Turn Right at Light in Florence onto Steubenville Pike Continue 1.5 miles on Steubenville Pike Turn Left on Haul Road Continue 1.7 miles on Haul Road (Gravel and Asphalt Road) Turn Right on Kramer Road (Gravel Road) Continue 0.7 miles on Kramer Road and turn left into entrance of Hillman State Park's Model Airfield Follow gravel road to airfield at top of hill.

**Please note that once you enter Hillman State Park, follow signage for Radio Control Model Airport to find Hillman State Park's Model Airfield.

From East (Pittsburgh)

Take US-22 West
Take the PA-18 exit for Florence/Burgettstown Turn Left at Light onto PA-18 North Turn Right at Light onto Steubenville Pike Continue 1.5 miles on Steubenville Pike Turn Left on Haul Road Continue 1.7 miles on Haul Road (Gravel and Asphalt Road) Turn Right on Kramer Road (Gravel Road) Continue 0.7 miles on Kramer Road and turn left into entrance of Hillman State Park's Model Airfield Follow gravel road to airfield at top of hill.

**Please note that once you enter Hillman State Park, follow signage for Radio Control Model Airport to find Hillman State Park's Model Airfield.

From West (Weirton and Steubenville)

Take US-22 East
Take the PA-18 exit for Florence/Burgettstown Turn Left onto PA-18 North Turn Right at Light onto Steubenville Pike Continue 1.5 miles on Steubenville Pike Turn Left on Haul Road Continue 1.7 miles on Haul Road (Gravel and Asphalt Road) Turn Right on Kramer Road (Gravel Road) Continue 0.7 miles on Kramer Road and turn left into entrance of Hillman State Park's Model Airfield Follow gravel road to airfield at top of hill.

**Please note that once you enter Hillman State Park, follow signage for Radio Control Model Airport to find Hillman State Park's Model Airfield.

Oct
19
Sat
2019
Wagman Star Party
Oct 19 @ 6:45 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Oct
20
Sun
2019
Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation
Oct 20 all-day

October 20 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 24.6 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Oct
21
Mon
2019
Orionids Meteor Shower
Oct 21 – Oct 22 all-day

October 21-22 – Orionids Meteor Shower. The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley which has been known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Oct
25
Fri
2019
Mingo Star Party
Oct 25 @ 6:30 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Oct
26
Sat
2019
Mingo Star Party
Oct 26 @ 6:30 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Oct
27
Sun
2019
Uranus at Opposition
Oct 27 all-day

October 27 – Uranus at Opposition. The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view Uranus. Due to its distance it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Oct
28
Mon
2019
New Moon
Oct 28 all-day

October 28 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 03:39 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
2
Sat
2019
Wagman Star Party
Nov 2 @ 6:15 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Wagman Observatory Phone: (724)224-2510

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Nov
5
Tue
2019
Taurids Meteor Shower
Nov 5 – Nov 6 all-day

November 5-6 – Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke. The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10. It peaks this year on the the night of November 5. The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving dark skies for viewing. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
8
Fri
2019
AAAP Meeting
Nov 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

General Business Meeting
Guest speaker and topic: Annual Kevin J. Brunelle Astrophotography Contest

Nov
9
Sat
2019
Mingo Star Party
Nov 9 @ 5:15 pm – 11:45 pm

For more information, please visit our Star Party link at:
http://wp.3ap.org/resources/star-parties/

Mingo Observatory Phone: (724)348-6150

Please Note: Safe solar observing begins approximately 2 hours prior to the event start time, with a break until dark sky observing begins.

For Moonset, Moonrise, and Sunset times, please visit the Time and Date website at:
https://www.timeanddate.com/

Nov
11
Mon
2019
Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun
Nov 11 all-day

November 11 – Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun. The planet Mercury will move directly between the Earth and the Sun. Viewers with telescopes and approved solar filters will be able to observe the dark disk of the planet Mercury moving across the face of the Sun. This is an extremely rare event that occurs only once every few years. The next transit of Mercury will not take place until 2039. This transit will be visible throughout all of South America and Central America and parts of North America; Mexico; Europe; the Middle East; and Africa. The best place to view this event in its entirety will be the eastern United States; Central America; and South America.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
12
Tue
2019
Full Moon
Nov 12 all-day

November 12 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 13:36 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze. It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter’s Moon.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
17
Sun
2019
Leonids Meteor Shower
Nov 17 – Nov 18 all-day

November 17-18 – Leonids Meteor Shower. The Leonids is an average shower producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th. The second quarter moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year but if you are patient you should be able to catch quite a few of the brightest ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
24
Sun
2019
Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter
Nov 24 all-day

November 24 – Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible on November 24. The two bright planets will be visible within 1.4 degrees of each other in the evening sky. Look for this impressive sight in the western sky just after sunset.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
26
Tue
2019
New Moon
Nov 26 all-day

November 26 – New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 15:06 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Nov
28
Thu
2019
Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation
Nov 28 all-day

November 28 – Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 20.1 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Dec
12
Thu
2019
Full Moon
Dec 12 all-day

December 12 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 05:14 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark. This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html

Dec
13
Fri
2019
Geminids Meteor Shower
Dec 13 – Dec 14 all-day

December 13-14 – Geminids Meteor Shower. The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. Unfortunately the nearly full moon will block out many of the meteors this year but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2019.html